Thing 43: Google Drawings (17/18)

I have been trying to branch out from the Google Suite but this is one tool I haven’t used yet.  I really appreciate all the ways it works well with other tools in the suite and I can see how it’ll be great for future projects.

I read Tony Vincent’s article Get Creative with Google Drawings at https://learninginhand.com/godraw/.  Tony Vincent is great at providing numerous examples and tools for teachers to modify and apply right away.  I explored Eric Curtis’ charts and appreciated Vincent’s note that Curtis shares his work to Creative Commons.  This is great to know and as an aside, I feel like Creative Commons and appropriate use information is becoming easier to find and use.  The Google Images search feature in Google Drawings gives a little information about using images fairly.

I also tried the Noun Project.  Another tool that is deliberately set up for people to think about whether attribution needs to be given.  I really like this tool.  If you pay for the tool, you have access to all icons without needing to give attribution.  If you don’t pay for it, you have to give attribution, but the site makes it incredibly easy.  As in, you don’t actually have to do anything, but attribution is attached to the icon you’ve downloaded, as you can see in the flower image below.

noun_212411_cc

The site explains, “To provide proper credit, use the embedded credit already in the icon you downloaded, or you can copy the attribution text and add it to your citations, about page, or place in which you would credit work you did not create.”  Just by using this site people will be more aware of copyright infringement and Creative Commons.

I also tried Auto Draw.  I didn’t have much luck.  Personally, I can see more use for my students using the Noun Project just because in elementary school drawing skills may not be refined enough to use this website effectively.  It is a fun website to use though!  Below you can see my attempt to draw a tree.  The site suggested spiders first, then the Mona Lisa, then I had a few Eiffel Towers to choose from, and finally grass.

autodraw 2_7_2018autodraw 2_7_2018

I wanted to see if Google Drawing would be an option for our upcoming infograph project.  We’re creating infographs on Air Pollution to participate in a contest with our ePals in India.  Another one of my favorite projects initiated from my participation in Cool Tools!

air pollution-1

While building this infograph, I learned how to crop images into shapes using the mask feature.  I was able to make the fruit and vegetable heart that way.  The icons are from the Noun Project.

Google Drawings definitely gives my students more options.  We need options when we don’t have enough computers or iPads to go around for a class.  This will give students more choices and enable them to work together from separate computers.  I would recommend Google Drawings as a great tool for teachers!

 

 

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One thought on “Thing 43: Google Drawings (17/18)

  1. Wonderful work here! You explored so many things. Love the epals projects! And thanks for sharing that it was a result of a CoolTools lesson, it’s wonderful to hear what kinds of projects evolve from the ideas sparked by the workshop, I had to chuckle at your autodraw example. Your drawing skills are just too good! I thought your tree was an autodraw suggestion. 🙂

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